Yak


Adventurous eaters are often willing to sample many different types of foods. Included on this list is often animal meat beyond the prototypical lamb, beef, pork and poultry that the vast majority of the world’s population most commonly consumes. One such product is yak meat.

Brief Overview Of The Yak


Related to the well-known cow, yaks are large and strong animals meeting the Bovine classification. Veterinary experts maintain that these animals possess three times the lung capacity of a cow. Ergo, said creatures are used by the populations of Asian nations like Tibet and Mongolia to perform various tasks like farming and transportation.

Additionally, yaks are considered valuable because they possess the ability to exist in extremely cold temperatures and can still remain rugged and healthy on a subsistence diet.

Yak Meat


Because the yak meets the Bovine classification and is similar to the cow, the meat extracted from these animals is considered red meat beef. Industry insiders suggest that this edible product is most similar to grass fed beef and bison meat.

Yak Meat Nutrition Facts


Nutritional experts suggest the yak’s flesh is healthy and rife with many health-boosting substances. Arguably, said product is most touted for its low fat content. Typically, yak is lean and does contain the elevated concentrations of unhealthy fats that typical cuts of beef possess.

Additionally, this type of animal meat has gained wide acceptance from the United States Department of Agriculture, often abbreviated as the USDA. Several yak-based meat products have been given official USDA nutritional labels. The agency maintains that the victuals contain high protein quantities and lesser amounts of potentially detrimental chemicals like sodium and cholesterol that are often found in typical beef products.

What Does Yak Meat Taste Like?


Culinary experts opine that this meat’s flavor is quite similar to that produced by grass fed beef. However, said food masters also suggest the edible item is milder, juicier and more succulent.

How To Cook Yak Meat?


Yak meat is made out of numerous well-known cuts that are similar to beef, such as steaks, ground, sirloin, ribs, roasts, tenderloin and cubed for stews. Such diversity enables chefs to prepare said product using numerous different methods like grilled, stewed, fried and baked.

Furthermore, culinary professionals maintain that this type of meat does not require a significant degree of spicing because of its lean and juicy makeup. Ergo, preparing said edible with basic staples like salt and pepper usually provide all the flavor enhancement necessary.

Who Eats Yak Meat?


Originally, this flesh was primarily consumed in regions where the animal is native like Himalayan Asia. That said, in recent years, the product has gained popularity and is enjoyed worldwide. Moreover, its nutritional content and being touted as healthier alternative to beef has increased its emergence as a trendy dish.

Where To Buy Yak Meat?


As the product is still in the process of gaining mainstream popularity, it is not often seen on supermarket meat counters. That said, yak’s meat is readily available for purchase online.

Additionally, the edible item can also be found inside establishments like farmer’s markets and specialty grocers, particularly those focusing on Asian cuisine from nations situated in or near the Himalayan Mountains.

Is Yak Meat Legal In The United States?


A yak’s meat cannot be legally imported into the United States due to a law prohibiting an influx of products from countries once impacted by the potentially fatal foot and mouth disease and other possibly serious cattle-striking ailments. That said, meat from yaks raised in the United States can be commercially sold.